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Old 07-28-2013, 08:08 AM   #11
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I've landed at Bader Field, which is now closed. With the wind from the west you'd fly right past the windows of the casino hotels on the approach. The airport was a dump, though, and I worried about even leaving the plane unattended there while I walked to the casino.
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Old 07-28-2013, 09:36 AM   #12
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http://www.airfields-freeman.com/NJ/...anticCity.html

Thanks for the additional info. The link above provides some additional history and pictures.
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Old 08-01-2013, 03:12 PM   #13
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I have a news article that came with the prop.


Prop was found in Barn in Mount Clemons, MI. (a suburb of Detroit, MI)

Research on Mount Clemons and any connection...

http://www.justinmuseum.com/ccchistory/dixonbio.html

Selfridge Field, Mount Clemens, Michigan (Historic Air National Guard airfield...opened 1917) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selfrid...nal_Guard_Base

1902-February 4 Charles Lindbergh's Birth in Detroit, Michigan on the site where the David Whitney Building now stands. When it came time to give birth to her son Evangeline returned to Detroit, Michigan to be under the care of her grandfather, Dr. Edwin Lodge, a respected physician. Charles was born in his uncle Edwin's three story brownstone at 1220 West Forest.



The Selfridge Military Air Museum and Air Park, located on Selfridge Air National Guard Base near Mount Clemens Michigan

http://www.selfridgeairmuseum.org



http://www.charleslindbergh.com/history

On May 20, Lindbergh took off in the Spirit of St. Louis from Roosevelt Field, near New York City, at 7:52 A.M. He landed at Le Bourget Field, near Paris, on May 21 at 10:21 P.M. Paris time (5:21 P.M. New York time). Thousands of cheering people had gathered to meet him. He had flown more than 3,600 miles (5,790 kilometers) in 33 1/2 hours.
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Last edited by TCT1911; 10-16-2013 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 08-01-2013, 03:44 PM   #14
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Shriner research.

Contacted Shriner International and they gave me contact info for...

Crescent Shriners, which is located in Westampton, New Jersey. They were founded in 1907 so there may be hope of digging up some history with them.

http://www.crescentshrine.org/home.html

This group hosted what was called "Imperial Session for 1927" in June of 1927.

Crescent Shriner history book 1904-1954...

http://shop.felcone.com/pages/books/...mple-1904-1954

Lindbergh's visit was in October. (His historic flight was in late May)

Crescent Temple...

http://www.preservationnj.org/site/E...rescent_Temple

NJ preservation...

http://www.preservationnj.org/site/E...x.php?/PNJSite

As of this posting I am in contact with the NJ Shriners and waiting for any info they may have.

New Jersey for the 53rd Annual Imperial Council Session held at the Hotel Chelsea Auditorium in Atlantic City, NJ on June 13, 1927. (could the prop have been used during this gathering in anticipation to his visit?)



Historic site for Freemasonry...

http://www.phoenixmasonry.org/main/


Lindbergh connection with the Masons....

In St. Louis, where the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers flow together, Lindbergh joined the Craft. Most famous Masons joined the fraternity before coming to world notice, and Lindbergh was no exception. He completed his degrees in Keystone Lodge Number 243, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri, in December of 1926, months before the flight that was to bring him world renown.
At the time, he was working as a mail pilot for Robertson Aircraft Corporation and already planning his trans-Atlantic flight in pursuit of the Orteig prize. Reading Lindbergh's own accounts of his experiences in 1926-27, one is struck by how thoroughly busy he was, making his efforts on acquiring the Masonic degrees more remarkable. During that period, he engaged in negotiations with aircraft manufacturers for the construction of the plane that was to be named The Spirit of St. Louis, flew the mail regularly between St. Louis and Chicago, and survived several parachute landings when bad weather forced him to ditch the mail plane. Only once did he fail to recover the mail bags and send them on by train.

Lindbergh's biographers, including Lindbergh himself, make essentially no mention of his connection with Masonry. Perhaps it was that he, like many other Masons, carried the duty of secrecy beyond that which is actually required. We do know that he wore the Square and Compasses on his historic flight and the plane bore a Masonic emblem; he also later joined the National Sojourners in St. Louis and the Sciots in San Diego.

All Shriners are Masons.
To be a Shriner you must first be a Mason. Until a few years ago one had to be a Mason and either a Knight Templar of the York Rite of Freemasonry or a 32ned degree Scottish Rite Mason but that extra requirement was dropped as Shrine membership decreased. Given their tendency to have rather raucous conventions Shriners are often known among other Masons as Drunken Masons. The vast majority of Masons are not Shriners but all Shriners are Masons.


Picture of Chelsea Hotel early 1900's...
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Last edited by TCT1911; 10-16-2013 at 11:33 AM.
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Old 08-01-2013, 09:13 PM   #15
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At this rate I suspect you're going to come across something that "clicks". Keep us posted. It's an excellent prop with or without the 1927 event.
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Old 08-02-2013, 02:39 PM   #16
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Some Curtiss R-9 pictures
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File Type: jpg R9Curtiss.jpg (44.5 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg R-9.jpg (88.7 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg R9.jpg (66.1 KB, 7 views)
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Old 08-02-2013, 02:43 PM   #17
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Few more pictures. I am fairly certain these are all R9's but sometimes they are labeled R6 when they are actually R9's. Hard to tell in some of the pictures.
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File Type: jpg curtR9.jpg (75.7 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg curtissr9pilot.jpg (68.8 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg Curtiss_R_9.jpg (92.5 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg R9front.jpg (40.4 KB, 7 views)

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Old 08-04-2013, 02:27 PM   #18
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I took a few pictures out in the sun today after wiping it down with a damp soft towell. Its amazing how the copper and the color in the wood pops in sunlight. I will post more later.
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File Type: jpg p1.jpg (70.1 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg p12.jpg (77.1 KB, 26 views)
File Type: jpg p123.jpg (72.1 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg p1234.jpg (79.4 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg p12345.jpg (98.8 KB, 22 views)
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Old 10-15-2013, 02:19 PM   #19
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The research is ongoing with this prop and specifically its history/connection to Charles Lindbergh's visit to Atlantic City in 1927.

I have updated previous posts in this thread with some new info but nothing earth shattering to report to date.

My wish is to find some pictures or news paper articles of Lindbergh visit with the prop on a wall or something that confirms its history.

I am also researching how/why the prop was located in recent times in the same area where Lindbergh was born. Maybe a museum, relative or someone took possession of it for a time then forgotten in the attic where it was found.

I found a few more pictures to post. Again, these planes may be R9's but its soooooo hard to tell because there are different versions of this Curtiss that have the same features.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 002-12.jpg (41.7 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg 003-12.jpg (47.9 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg 3437L.jpg (40.1 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg brantpointnantucket1918.jpg (73.4 KB, 6 views)

Last edited by TCT1911; 10-16-2013 at 09:35 AM.
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Old 02-20-2015, 05:47 PM   #20
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http://www.atlanticcityweekly.com/ne...fe6eb3613.html

Posted: Wednesday, February 9, 2011 12:00 am
Tom Wilk
In a seemingly commonplace scene, a small plane circled in the air over Atlantc City’s Bader Field and prepared to land on Oct. 19, 1927.
On the ground, the scene was anything but ordinary as a sense of excitement grew. A crowd of about 5,000 craned their necks skyward for the arrival of a national hero: Col. Charles A. Lindbergh and his Spirit of St. Louis.
Five months earlier, Lindbergh had made aviation history with the first solo non-stop flight across the Atlantic Ocean, traveling from Roosevelt Field on Long Island, N.Y., to Le Bourget airport in Paris. He flew 3,610 miles in 33 hours and 30 minutes.
If that flight were a sprint, Lindbergh was now involved in a marathon. The 25-year-old aviator and his airplane were wrapping up a three-month tour that would take him to all 48 states in the union.
Lindbergh would visit 92 cities, deliver 147 speeches and ride an estimated 1,290 miles in parades between July 20 and Oct. 23, 1927.
In Atlantic City, Lindbergh maneuvered his plane to a perfect landing on the rain-soaked airfield after a two-hour flight from Baltimore.
After his solitary flight over the Atlantic, Lindbergh had plenty of company at Bader Field, including Atlantic City Mayor Anthony Ruffu, Enoch “Nucky” Johnson, treasurer of Atlantic County and Republican Party boss, and a contingent of students from Atlantic City schools.
An amplification system was set up at the airport to allow Lindbergh’s remarks to be heard by all in attendance. The national tour was designed to promote the importance of aviation in the United States.
“As airports are established, we need your cooperation in backing air activities, which they would bring,” Lindbergh said.
In a separate interview, he offered praise for Bader Field: “The Atlantic City airport has good possibilities, and is in an ideal location to the city proper,” Lindbergh said. “In fact, it is the best situated in that respect, I think, than any I have yet encountered.”
While a contingent of Atlantic City police officers stood guard over the Spirit of St. Louis, protecting it from anyone seeking a souvenir from the historic plane, Lindbergh left Bader Field in the mayor’s car and headed to the Ritz Carlton Hotel at Iowa Avenue and the Boardwalk for his two-night stay in the city.
His first order of business was a meal as Lindbergh ordered oyster stew, lamb chops and a club sandwich from room service at the hotel. It was a culinary upgrade from the sandwiches and canteen water that sustained him on his flight to Europe.
Lindbergh, who recalled visiting Atlantic City as a boy, stayed primarily in his hotel room. He did venture out to make a few purchases at Boardwalk shops while enjoying the salt air. Many of the bellhops at the hotel proudly displayed autographed photographs of the aviator.
After his arrival at Bader Field, Lindbergh’s next public appearance was a testimonial dinner at the Chelsea Hotel. About 900 people packed the assembly hall for what was the social event of the season.
A specially designed menu featured a photograph of the Spirit of St. Louis on the cover. He referred to himself and the plane as “We,” which served as the title of his book about his flight.
Ruffu and Rep. Isaac Bacharach served as the event’s opening speakers. “I see in Col. Lindbergh the type of American youth of today in whom I have great confidence,” the congressman said.
Lindbergh, who received a mayoral proclamation, was then introduced and received a standing ovation of several minutes before he could speak.
Lindbergh again returned to the theme of his tour — aviation.
“We do not know the exact future of aviation, all we know is that is in a rapidly developing stage and is on the way to becoming one of the chief industries,” he said.
The truth of his words would be fulfilled in the coming decades as flying became a regular occurrence, narrowing the distance between nations.
On Oct. 21, Lindbergh prepared to leave Atlantic City to conclude his national tour before his final stop at Long Island, N.Y.
Lindbergh’s future was unwritten as he spoke to reporters in an informal interview at his hotel as he contemplated the end of the tour.
“For the first time in a long while, I’ll be out of a job. I have made absolutely no plans for the future.”
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