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Old 06-12-2015, 09:43 AM   #11
Dan h
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Default Newspaper article

Here is a scan of an old newspaper article written in the 1950's discussing the crash.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:32 AM   #12
Dbahnson
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Originally Posted by Dan h View Post
Do you think it might be a JN4? Wouldn't that be a very early propeller to put on that plane? I know our town had liberty bond events in 1918-1919. Maybe if the old car in the background could be identified that could help also.
I doubt it very much. All of the Jenny props I've seen (OX5 and Hisso engines) had 8 bolt holes with a larger center hole for the hub. The six bolt holes and the nearly absent central bore suggests some kind of very early engine/hub arrangement. Knowing the diameter (length of the prop before losing a blade) will help narrow down the possibilities.

Keep in mind that the car manufacture date, like the propeller manufacturing date, don't necessarily date the event itself as both may be several years old when the event occurs.
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Old 06-20-2015, 10:47 PM   #13
Dan h
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Default Measured the prop

I got the prop pictured here measured today and it's 50-1/2" from center to the end. Does this help anymore in identifying the engine or the plane pictured?
I guess that would make it right at 101" overall.
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Old 06-21-2015, 07:22 AM   #14
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It's a little longer than a JN4 prop, but besides that it has the 6 bolt hole hub with the narrow center bore. My opinion is that it precedes the JN4 and its OX5 engine, but narrowing it down to a specific plane by its remaining characteristics is likely to be very difficult, and probably better approached from investigating the accident itself rather than working from the propeller alone.

One thing, if you find that the car is a specific year model you'd know that the crash could not have occurred before that.
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Old 08-26-2019, 12:29 PM   #15
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For what it is worth several years later, having made a detailed comparison between photos of various Curtiss JN-4 aircraft and the aircraft in the photo, in my considered opinion the crashed aircraft is definitely a JN-4.
As there are features of the propeller that do not correspond with a JN-4 item, I would very respectfully question whether the information concerning the history of the propeller can be verified as accurate.
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:51 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Mtskull View Post
For what it is worth several years later, having made a detailed comparison between photos of various Curtiss JN-4 aircraft and the aircraft in the photo, in my considered opinion the crashed aircraft is definitely a JN-4.
As there are features of the propeller that do not correspond with a JN-4 item, I would very respectfully question whether the information concerning the history of the propeller can be verified as accurate.
When you say "the aircraft in the photo" I presume that you mean this photo:



That looks like a Curtiss Jenny to me, but the JN4 was developed around 1916 and the propeller in your pictures was manufactured around 1912. The Jenny was powered by either a Curtiss OX5 or a Hispano Suiza (Hisso) engine, and both of those used a hub that had 8 bolt holes, not six.

There is absolutely NO reason to believe that the propeller piece that you have pictured above has anything to do with the JN4 or with the plane in the picture above. It's from an earlier aircraft that likely can never be accurately identified. You can't believe most of the stories that are attached to items like this. Some of them, like this, are implausible in almost every respect.
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Old 08-27-2019, 12:52 AM   #17
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David, thank you; I agree with all of that.
Just for clarification, as the form of words I used might have led to a misunderstanding; it was another forum member, not me, who posted the original propeller and aircraft photos; I was just offering my humble opinion, having recently joined the forum and having taken an interest in the “mystery”.

Last edited by Mtskull; 08-27-2019 at 01:10 AM.
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:08 AM   #18
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My apologies, as it was a misunderstanding due to my quick re-read of an old thread. Thanks.
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