Wooden Propeller Forum  

Go Back   Wooden Propeller Forum > Wooden Propeller Identification > "Modern" Wooden Propellers

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-02-2009, 12:27 PM   #1
AllStar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Identification of a Heine prop

Hi,

I found a Heine prop and would like to know more about it. You guys have any idea what prop this is and what it's worth? You can also send me a message if you would like to buy it

Specs I found:
450 PS
N LYON
D 280
H 320
HEINE
37799


Some pictures:





Last edited by Dave; 09-02-2009 at 01:35 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 01:36 PM   #2
Dave
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,831
Default

How long is it from tip to tip?

Are there holes drilled in one side of the hub?


Despite the spelling, I'm wondering if it was intended for the 450 horsepower Napier Lion engine.
__________________
Dave
Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 01:51 PM   #3
AllStar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave View Post
How long is it from tip to tip?

Are there holes drilled in one side of the hub?


Despite the spelling, I'm wondering if it was intended for the 450 horsepower Napier Lion engine.
Length from tip to tip, hmm, good question. My guess is 220cm, I will check that though . .

There are holes drilled in the other side, lots of them. Forgot to take a photo of that side
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 04:40 PM   #4
Bob Gardner
Moderator
 
Bob Gardner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The North of England
Posts: 1,450
Default

Hallo Tim,

Your thread is probably in the wrong category, although I admit it is borderline!

Your prop is not really modern. The Napier Lion engine of 450 hp was made by the British from 1917 to 1919. It was capable of considerable evolution and by 1930 in supercharged form it was producing 1350 hp, although in short-life racing engine form.

Heine was a German firm in Berlin who read the terms of the Versailles treaty and quickly turned to making props for the civilian market. Germany couldn't make military props until 1925 or 1926.

The serial number suggests the prop was made around 1920-23. It was for a civilian aircraft. The diameter is 280cm and the pitch is 320cm.

Sadly there is not much of a market in props from the inter-war years. I think it is worth at most 580 Euros, about $800.

With kind regards,

Bob
__________________
Bob Gardner
Author; WW1 British Propellers, WWI German Propellers
http://www.aeroclocks.com

Last edited by Bob Gardner; 09-03-2009 at 08:37 AM.
Bob Gardner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 05:45 PM   #5
AllStar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Gardner View Post
Hallo Tim,

Your thread is probably in the wrong category, although I admit it is borderline. But your prop is not really modern. The Napier Lion engine of 450 hp was made by the British from 1917 to 1919. It was capable of considerable evolution and by 1930 in supercharged form it was producing 1350 hp, although in short-life racing engine form.

Heine was a German firm in Berlin who read the terms of the Versailles treaty and quickly turned to making props for the civilian market. Germany couldn't make military props until 1925 or 1926.

The serial number suggests the prop was made around 1920-23. It was for a civilian aircraft. The diameter is 280cm and the pitch is 320cm.

Sadly there is not much of a market in props from the inter-war years. I think it is worth at most 580 Euros, about $800.

With kind regards,

Bob
Thank you very much for your reply, it's nice to read what propeller it is and when it was made!
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 05:57 AM   #6
Bob Gardner
Moderator
 
Bob Gardner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The North of England
Posts: 1,450
Default

Hi Tim,

I can see that one side of the hub is blank; no bolt holes drilled. What about the other side? Are there four holes there which only penetrate about 5cm into the wood? After WW1, Heine made several types of prop with a quick release coupling called a Rupp fastener. Instead of eight or more bolts, there were no bolts, except for the large one on the end of the crankshaft. The prop slid onto four studs and one large bolt held it on. Hence Dave's question. Can you take a photograph for us?

The spelling of Lion is typical of Heine. I suspect that the man who stamped the data on the hubs was semi-literate. He made lots of errors. He never mastered the letter N which he often stamped upside down.

With kind regards,

Bob
__________________
Bob Gardner
Author; WW1 British Propellers, WWI German Propellers
http://www.aeroclocks.com
Bob Gardner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 10:04 AM   #7
AllStar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Pictures of the other side (no holes, my bad )





  Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 10:49 AM   #8
Dave
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,831
Default

It's been cut out for a clock, which reduces its already low value. It also looks on some of the photographs that it has been shortened. It should 280cm long. Is it?
__________________
Dave
Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 10:50 AM   #9
AllStar
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave View Post
It's been cut out for a clock, which reduces its already low value. It also looks on some of the photographs that it has been shortened. It should 280cm long. Is it?
Yes, 280cm long
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2009, 06:30 AM   #10
Bob Gardner
Moderator
 
Bob Gardner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The North of England
Posts: 1,450
Default

Good Morning Tim,

Thank you for the additional photographs.

I have seen several Heine props which are not drilled in any way. They all date from late WW1 or the 1920's. I suspect that they might have been delivered to customers this way to be prepared for Rupp fasteners. I think it likely that Rupp fasteners were made by the Rupp company in a range of sizes.

Although Heine props from the 1920's are not particularly collectable, yours is nonetheless a valuable artefact from that time, in academic terms. Also the wood used is both of high quality and beautiful. Please make sure it goes to a good home. As you are in the Netherlands you might wish to research the KLM airline and its predecessors to see if they operated an aircraft in the 1920's with the Napier Lion engine.

Probably eBay is the best way to sell it. As well as the English language eBay, you might consider putting it on eBay.NL and on ebay.DE in German.

If you discover what aircraft it might have come from, please let me know.

With kind regards,

Bob
__________________
Bob Gardner
Author; WW1 British Propellers, WWI German Propellers
http://www.aeroclocks.com
Bob Gardner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9 Beta 3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.