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Old 10-22-2012, 07:46 AM   #1
Bretta
 
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Default 160 Beardmore propellers New pics added

Hello Gents,

I have two propeller blades which seem to come from a four-bladed propeller before being sawn up to become individual blades for display purposes. They look identical to the one posted in the thread below, although I think they are bigger

http://woodenpropeller.com/forumvB/s...ead.php?p=8853

They are in good condition but the brass could do with a polish. Do I dare polish them or do collectors like them to be untouched?

Meanwhile, here's a teaser pic.




kind regards
Bretta

Last edited by Bretta; 10-23-2012 at 04:17 PM.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:10 PM   #2
Bob Gardner
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Hi Bretta,

The hub in your photograph is for an FE2B.

The data translates as;

LP982A The drawing number for a four bladed prop designed by the Lang Propeller Company for the FE2B. This was one of a few props listed as standard props for that aircraft from July 1918 onwards.
LH Rotation of the prop.
RAE The aircraft was designed by the Royal Aircraft Establishment.
160 Beardmore The engine, a 160hp Beardmore.
D2740 Diameter of the prop, 2740mm
P1260 Pitch of the prop, 1260mm
PROP 27480Serial number of the maker, possibly Boulton & Paul.

If you intend to sell your two blades, leave them as they are.

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:16 PM   #3
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Hi there Bob,

Thank you so much for the info, I knew what the Diameter and Pitch was thanks to digging around on this forum but had no idea what the rest of it meant... very interesting indeed and thanks again.

I will take some photos of the props in full during the week and post them here.

I think I probably will sell them in the end but they do hold some sentimental value as I remember them on the wall when I was a kid.

My father used to be involved in digging up WWII aircraft in the 70s and was also interested in anything related to planes.

kind regards
Bretta
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:22 PM   #4
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We look forward to the photos!

Bob
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Old 10-23-2012, 04:17 PM   #5
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Default More photos

Here's some pics that I took tonight.











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Old 10-23-2012, 08:06 PM   #6
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Default Greetings from Seattle Wa.

Thank you so much for posting these great shots of what is left over of the 4 bladed prop you have.

May I inquire as to what part of the world you live in, and if indeed you are considering selling these blades, are you going to sell them as a pair or as singles?

Also, are you going to list them on E bay or do some more research as to what the percieved value of them are as singles or as a pair?

Please feel free to get back to me when you have time, I would be interested in buying them as a pair or possibly only one of them, but as a pair is more desirable.

Enclosed is my information on my business card.

Sincerely,
Dennis Hicklin
Seattle Washington
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Old 10-24-2012, 05:51 AM   #7
Bretta
 
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Smile Hi Dennis

Hi Dennis,

Yes, I'm in the market to sell them, but at this stage I have no idea what their value is... there seems to be little information about them on the net. I'd be happy to let them go as a pair.

Thanks to Bob's excellent information I have enjoyed reading up on the FE2B and it's been nice to finally match a picture of the plane to the props... it's solved a 35 year mystery for me.

I'm based in the south-east of England, so couriering to the US might be an expensive problem.

I, too, am involved in the graphics/print industry - specialising in magazines. Maybe if you sponsored me to work in the US I would bring them along with me... ha, ha

kindest regards
Bretta
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Old 10-24-2012, 08:46 AM   #8
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Bretta, I think you'll find that pieces of propellers (unless they have some documentable clearly historic basis, which is rare) aren't worth very much, especially without decals on them.

I noticed that the method of cutting the hub seems very strange and unsymmetrical, but have no idea why.
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Old 10-24-2012, 09:23 AM   #9
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Hi Dave,

Yes, the method of cutting is very strange indeed, I have no idea why they were cut that way either.

I'm afraid there's no documented history with these other than they were found in a barn and have been in my family for at least 35 years.

As for value, I would like to know but thought it a bit rude to ask as a newbie poster, but am more than happy for you guys to give me your opinions if you wish.

kind regards
Bretta
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Old 10-24-2012, 10:05 AM   #10
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Bretta,

Dave is correct about the price. A blade and part hub might sell at auction for 150.00 GBP, about $250 USD. The blade with the data stamped on it is likely to raise the value to around 200 GBP, $320 USD.

The angular shape of the blades is typical of the designs made by Dashwood Lang of the Lang Propeller company. You'll recall that the drawing number begins with LP for this company.

The brass sheathing at the tips identifies the prop as from a pusher aircraft, which the FE2B was. It was there to prevent erosion caused by sand or dust blasting, thrown up by the wheels ahead of the prop and drawn into the rotating disc of the prop with grass, twigs and small stones. And when in action spent cartridges, maps, pencils and the odd glove might well have followed.

The sheathing is typically British. The screw holes were countersunk and when the screws had been fitted a touch of solder was added and smoothed flat so not to impede the airflow.

Your blades date from the latter half of 1918 because of the letters RAE for the Royal Aircraft Establishment which hitherto was known as the RAF for the Royal Aircraft Factory.

The blade is likely to have come direct from a squadron and was divided into four for ease of carriage home.

With kind regards,

Bob
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