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Old 07-03-2019, 06:22 AM   #1
dtchacos
 
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Default Wooden Pitch Propeller

Hi everyone,

I happen to have purchased 2 wooden pitch propellers that i would like to identify off which plane / engine it came off.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Dee

https://drive.google.com/file/d/152F...ew?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rrV...ew?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_90...ew?usp=sharing
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:12 AM   #2
Dbahnson
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There are many, many possibilities and not enough information in those photos to tell.

I would suggest contacting Monte Chase at notplanejane.com for any help with variable pitch propellers.
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Old 07-08-2019, 06:06 AM   #3
dtchacos
 
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Hi Dbahnson,

Thanks for the suggestion, i have sent them an email but meanwhile thought you could give me some hints of what further details are needed to have them ready when asked.

Hub size ? diameter ?, number of bolting holes ?, bolt hole sizes ? , propeller length is measured from up till the hub ?, width is variable depending on which part is required and so on, i am not an expert as i dont the criteria it depends on in detail.

Thanks
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Old 07-08-2019, 06:13 AM   #4
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I think that the stamped numbers may be all that he needs. If you know the manufacturer that's also usually helpful, along with photos of the blades.
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:46 AM   #5
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Hi

I have managed to clean up a bit the hub to see the numbers stamped on it if that is of any help, attached some pictures, What do you think ?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_8170.jpg (91.9 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_8171.jpg (98.5 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_8172.jpg (95.8 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_8181.jpg (97.1 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_8187.jpg (97.8 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_8189.jpg (95.6 KB, 7 views)
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Old 07-09-2019, 11:08 AM   #6
Dbahnson
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Still, contact Monte Chase.
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:22 AM   #7
Bob Gardner
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It is a beautiful example of a prop made before or during WW2 by the Hordern-Richmond Company of Great Britain where Dashwood Lang was the prop designer.

The prop is made by the Hydulignum process, devised in Germany. It is the first example of what is now known as Composites. As can be seen, it comprises laminations of wood, often birch or beech.

Hydulignum comprises non-impregnated, densified wood laminates developed especially for a wide range of industrial applications. Selected beech veneers are kiln dried to a given moisture content, cut and assembled into packs with a film of synthetic resin coating the individual veneers. The packs are then subjected to extreme pressure and temperature, causing them to be bonded to form laminated boards.

The prop in this photograph has lost its protective coat, which is a cotton sheath pulled onto the blade and soaked with synthetic resin and again subjected to extreme pressure and temperature. It forms a very effective protective coat which is extremely difficult to remove, often impossible.

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:53 AM   #8
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The prop was made by Rotol. The part number RA100 62 RA indicates that it was a blade from a three bladed prop used on the Hercules aero-engine Mks VI and XVII, which powered the Vickers Wellington bomber, Marks XI, XII, XIII, XIV.

With kind regards,

Bob Gardner
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Last edited by Bob Gardner; 07-11-2019 at 08:06 AM.
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Old 07-11-2019, 11:33 AM   #9
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Interesting as it didn't look laminated in the traditional sense.
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Old 07-11-2019, 12:07 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Gardner View Post
.../...
The prop is made by the Hydulignum process, devised in Germany. It is the first example of what is now known as Composites. As can be seen, it comprises laminations of wood, often birch or beech.
.../...
Hi Bob,

Very intesting! Do you know what is the difference with Micarta and Permali processes? Permali looks very similar (see attached pic), but the making process is perhaps different?

Best regards,
PM
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