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Old 07-24-2018, 09:27 PM   #1
jschoppaul
 
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Default Early Wooden Propeller. 6 Holes, Chauvier type

Hello,
I bought this at an antique store a few years ago in the states. The owner bought it at an antique store in France in the 70’s.
1) There are NO identifying marks.
2) 6 holes, a distinguishing characteristic.
3) Does appear to have been mounted various times.

Tip to tip 82 1/2” ( 209.55 cm )

Holes appear to be 5/16” ( 0.794 cm )

Hub thickness 3 1/4” ( 8.255 cm )

Shaft hole 2” across ( 5.08 cm )
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Old 07-25-2018, 07:27 AM   #2
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Hi,

It is not a Chauvière. Could you post pics of the sides of the hub?

Regards,
Pierre-Michel
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Old 07-25-2018, 02:40 PM   #3
Bob Gardner
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And it doesn't look like a British made prop. The apparent pitch and the diameter of 2095mm suggest a small aircraft with a comparatively low powered engine, I think.

Over to you Dave!

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 07-25-2018, 04:55 PM   #4
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Default Early wooden propeller

Thanks for the replies,
I’ll try to be quick on my end.
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Old 07-25-2018, 05:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Gardner View Post
And it doesn't look like a British made prop. The apparent pitch and the diameter of 2095mm suggest a small aircraft with a comparatively low powered engine, I think.

Over to you Dave!

With kind regards,

Bob
I don't know what it is either, and I doubt that it can be identified. Note that on the side view it appears to be a solid piece of lumber, unlike most other propellers, which are laminated.
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Old 07-25-2018, 06:31 PM   #6
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Hi,

No laminations, no flared side of the central hole and very small bolts... It could be a very very early prop, or, more probably, an amateur construction. Perhaps not for an aircraft.
I don't see how it could be identified... Do you know which wood it is made of?

Has your phone or tablet a built in clinometer? Do you know how to measure the pitch?

Regards,
PM
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Old 07-25-2018, 11:53 PM   #7
jschoppaul
 
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Default Early wooden propeller

Hello,
Thanks again for all your help.
1) Yes, it is a solid wood propeller, no laminations.
2) It does look like it was used. There are hub markings from compression, tip damage ( slight ), and leading edge wear.
I tried to measure pitch. Bear with me on my math.
I used to formula of:
PITCH = 2.36 x diameter height / width.

I measured “diameter height” of 1 7/8” or 1.875” at the 75% mark.
I measured the “width” at the 75% mark as 7 3/8”, or 7.375”
So, 2.36 x 1.875 / 7.375 = .6

Does this sound reasonable?

Thanks again for everyone who is trying to help. Even an “age” range would be nice.
John Schoppaul
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Old 07-26-2018, 07:52 AM   #8
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Looking at the photographs of the side of the prop shows it be thinner than I expected.

I doubt if we can offer any more help. You might wish to explore photographs of every early aircraft you can find on the internet, starting with the Wright Brothers; and also Google early hand-carved aeroplane propellers. Let us know if you find something.

If your prop is an early hand-carved American or European propeller it is of historical importance.

And I enjoyed looking at your cat. When I was writing my books on British WW1 props about ten years ago, I took illustrative photographs outside in natural light and was always accompanied by one or more of our cats who joined in the process to see what the human tin-opener was doing.

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 07-26-2018, 07:59 AM   #9
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A postscript: you might also wish to find a dendrologist at a local university who would be able to date the wood from the rings, but they would need to bore a hole to obtain a sample.

Bob
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Old 07-26-2018, 03:01 PM   #10
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pmdec

Hello,
After your comment ( appreciated ), I re-measured the bolt holes.
I was mistaken, they are actually 3/8” ( not the 5/16” I quoted earlier ).

Thanks again everyone.
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