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Old 04-08-2019, 01:29 PM   #11
Ian Woodford
 
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..and is it possible that the B&C2099 stamped on the propeller is the drawing number?
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Old 04-08-2019, 01:53 PM   #12
Dbahnson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian Woodford View Post
Thank you again for your time and efforts on this. What exactly do you mean by gunfire tests?
Apparently they wanted to test the propeller's ability to withstand gunfire. I'm just guessing but it would seem to me that the most valid test would one where the propeller was spinning rather than sitting still. That's why I'm also guessing that they might have chosen a pusher configuration to expose the largest amount of propeller surface.
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Old 04-10-2019, 11:40 AM   #13
Bob Gardner
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The Royal Navy fired machine-gun and rifle rounds at one of these props early in WW1 to see if armouring a prop against small arms fire was necessary. As a result of these tests they concluded that it wasn't.

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 04-21-2019, 02:17 PM   #14
Ian Woodford
 
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Sorry for not seeing this reply sooner.
Interestingly there is a sliver missing off one of the edges of this propeller. I need to have a closer look at it because maybe it's been hit by gunfire.
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Old 04-22-2019, 08:26 AM   #15
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I've taken some more photos. The damage to the trailing edge doesn't have obvious bullet damage and it looks like someone has tried to mend it at some time. I'm not sure it's a pusher prop. Please see these photos. There is a rounded entry to the 2 1/2 inch bore on one side only. Does this mean anything?
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Old 04-22-2019, 09:46 AM   #16
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Trailing edge damage is very common, and I think it usually results from handling of the propeller when it's not mounted on the engine.

It's a little unusual to see a recessed hub on both sides of the hub, but two photos show that this is the case with yours.



The rounded edge on the center bore is the one that attaches to the hub closest to the engine. If the wrong side is attached closest to the hub, the propeller functions the in much the same way with respect to the direction of air movement as if done correctly but in that case the trailing edge by design becomes the leading edge in its action, and it would cause the propeller to easily damaged, as well as resulting in some aerodynamic inefficiency due to the differently shaped surfaces.

So on yours the rounded intrados was attached to the engine, and the Gnome engine rotates in the direction of the arrow. So as the propeller moves forward the front of it is the curved surface and the rear is the flat surface, which is the pusher configuration, as would be expected.

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