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Old 07-01-2008, 08:59 AM   #11
Harold Lake
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Keil182,

This post is pretty stale...by 6-months...but I just came upon this forum. The prop blade you aquired from Europe is in fact a German blade designed and manufactured by OMW (Otto Mader Werk - i.e. Junkers) Luftschrauben. The blade's part number, 9-17302, indicates which aircraft was eligible for this item. My list is somewhat incomplete, and I know more about which types did not use it, than those which did. Nevertheless, prime candidates were the Junkers 87 "Stuka" and the Fw 190 A,F and G-series (resp. fighter, fighter-bomber and extened range fighter-bomber). The blade's serial number (werknummer), 27145/2 is preceed by three code letters for the factory that made the part. You list, "nlb" but I am sure you mean "rlb." I hope to have the information as to this precise maker within a short time but, my guess is that it could have been the Junkers facility at Flaming, SW of Berlin.

Hal
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Old 09-04-2008, 09:54 AM   #12
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Following my earlier posting, I have since determined that this prop blade was not linked to a Junkers propeller as stated earlier but, instead came from a VDM (Verinigte Deutsche Metallwerk AG - United German Metal Works) propeller as evidenced by it's "9" part number. We now know this because part numbers falling in the 10000 range signified VDM units whereas part numbers in the 20000 block denoted Junkers. Further, although most VDM props were powered by Daimler-Benz motors this was not alaways the case. We have yet to find out exactly which German airplane flew with wooden 9-17302 props.

Hal
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Old 09-05-2008, 04:57 AM   #13
Bob Gardner
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Many thanks from this forum for your excellent research, and for telling us about it.

On a personal note do you have any info on German WW1 props?

mfg

Bob
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Old 09-05-2008, 09:11 AM   #14
Harold Lake
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No, unfortunately, my prop documents are mostly confined the Third Reich period. But according to the noted authority and author Bruno Lange, by 1918 there were no less than 20 German propeller makers in business. Others sprang up in 1919/1920 but, after this period only 3 firms were still making wooden propellers: Hugo Heine Propellerwerk, Berlin; J.H. Schaefer & Co., Bremen and Propellerwerk Gustav Schwarz KG, Berlin-Waidmannslust. However, by 1944, a great deal of sub-contracting was the order of the day. This factor, coupled with German security measures, is what makes our job of identifying wooden prop balde makers so "interesting." Master copies of the German 3-letter codes exist, but most only extend through the alphabet to "ozz" so any code beyond this is much more difficult to decipher.

Hal
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Old 09-05-2008, 09:30 AM   #15
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Hello Hal,

I agree that chasing down details of props is interesting. So little data is available about WW1 German Props that a new discovery makes my week! No matter how small.

There were seven major German makers before WW1 and six minor. A total of 65 makers existed at some time between 1914 and 1919. They tended to come and go. Almost all became bankrupt at the end of the war, as did British WW1 makers.

With regards,

Bob
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Old 09-05-2008, 05:17 PM   #16
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One of the more esoteric topics dealing with German propeller design and research during the Third Reich had to do with the number of blades, whether of wood or metal, favored by the aircraft industry. For example, with few exceptions, only aircraft with turbosuperchargers used 4-blade props. An exception was the multi-engine Heinkel 177, but in the area of single and twin-engine fighters, 4-blade props were very rare. Contrast this approach with that of the Allies (and maybe even Japan) and you see a pattern. Years ago, a friend told me that it was his opinion German propeller R&D was way ahead of the Allies. Maybe, but I think this could be a hard case to prove.

Hal
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Old 04-07-2010, 09:16 AM   #17
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I have two more complete propeller blades of the same type:


The number is: 9-17302 A-4
WNr. rlf 81695/1 on one blade (WNr. rlf 81940/2 on other)
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