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Old 05-20-2014, 08:51 PM   #1
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Default Need Help to identify an early wooden propeller

Hello, could you help please. We have an early wooden propeller to be identified. The info on it is G98 N24 / T5638 FE2B 120 Ato Dlr. Hope that you can help me.
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Old 05-24-2014, 11:18 AM   #2
Bob Gardner
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Welcome to the forum.

G98 N24 Prop 24 out of 100 in batch 98, which dates the prop to Autumn 1917.
T5638 The RAF drawing number for the prop used on the FE2B aircraft
FE2B the aircraft type
120 Ato Dlr this reads 120hp Austro-Daimler, the engine

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 05-27-2014, 07:37 PM   #3
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Hi Bob, Thank you for your reply and the information. I now have some photos of the propeller and can send them if needed. I am a little perplexed though, because the propeller is 2 bladed and I thought the FE2B propeller was 4 bladed. kind regards Robyn
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Old 05-28-2014, 06:56 AM   #4
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'Morning Robyn,

What does AAFM stand for? I have got as far Air Force Museum but have failed on the first letter A!

The standard FE2B props (which indicates props approved by the Air Board, very often by comparative flight tests) are listed below in the order:
Drg No, Standard? Blades, Engine Type

T5638 Yes 2 120hp, 160hp AD
T9669 No 4 140hp RAF (experimental?)
T28005 Yes 4 160hp AD
LP982A Yes 4 160hp AD
LP8703 No 4 160hp AD


LP982A appears to have been the most widely used.

My guess is that a two bladed prop was used on the first aircraft, both the 120hp and the improved 160hp but a longer more efficient prop could not be used because of the constrictions of the struts to the tail empennage in this pusher aircraft and hence a four blade prop came into majority use.

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:14 PM   #5
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Hello Bob,

Thank you again for your reply. I also went back through some previous posts and found the answer yesterday.

The AAFM is the Australian Army Flying Museum, located in Oakey Queensland. Our charter is the preservation of Australian Army flying history for the Australian Flying Corps 1912-1919, Australian Army flying 1948-1968 and the Australian Army Aviation Corps 1968 - present.

As a bynote, the AFC had only one FE2b which had a 4 blade prop so was obviously a later variant with a larger engine. My puzzle now is how the this prop made it to Australia after WWI and I guess it was souvenired by an Australian Soldier returning home. The prop was presented to a local state school in 1928 as a form of remembrance for soldiers from the Great War. This school was closed in Dec 13 after approx 150 years and the Education Dept decided to donate it to out Museum. Kind regards Robyn
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:42 PM   #6
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Interestingly, there is a nearly identical propeller that has been for sale on eBay in the U.K. for several months now, I think. Different "G" and "N" numbers but very similar markings, including the drawing number.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wooden-Aircr...item43b9dd5e42
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Old 05-29-2014, 05:35 AM   #7
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Hi Dave,

Thank you also. I had a look at the link and yes the one for sale on ebay could be a twin to the one we have received. Ours however has obviously been attached to an aircraft as it has wear signs on the side of the hobb with all the embossing. regards Robyn
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Old 05-29-2014, 10:01 AM   #8
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I contacted the seller of that prop, and hopefully he'll chime in here. Evidently he found information that the Austro-Daimler engine was actually built under license by Beardmore.

Bob, how much later would the "G324" production for that one have been?
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Old 05-29-2014, 12:01 PM   #9
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Dave and Robyn,

The batch number 324 probably dates from late February or early March 1918.

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 05-29-2014, 08:47 PM   #10
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Bob and Dave,

info on the engine can be found at:

http://museumvictoria.com.au/collect...and-circa-1914

thanks for your help

Robyn
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