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Old 10-17-2017, 04:31 PM   #1
cman
 
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Default hope someone can help!

I got this old prop from a friend of mine and always wondered what it came off of. My dad originally told me to find a serial number on it and that might help but, after going over it with a fine tooth comb there isn't a single number or letter on this thing anywhere.
So, with that being said all I have is a good story: My friend found this in the barn on his family farm in Perrysburg, Ohio. The farm was used as an army airfield and Eddie Rickenbacker flew out of it.

The prop is 100" from busted tip to tip.

That's all I got!

Let me know if anyone can do anything with this info.

Thanks,
Chris
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File Type: jpg prop 2a.jpg (46.9 KB, 8 views)
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Old 10-17-2017, 05:19 PM   #2
Dbahnson
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It could be almost anything, and without numbers stamped on it the possibilities are wide ranging.

This ridge (see the attached photo) isn't normal, and suggests that the hub was cut out at some point then filled with a milled piece of wood overlapping the native surface.

I would review this page, measure the hub dimensions very carefully and see if you can eliminate most of the engines listed on the linked page.
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Old 10-17-2017, 06:08 PM   #3
cman
 
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Thats not a ridge its the thru hole behind the crush plate. The plate is just sitting in place.

I printed out the hub dimension info and chart and will go through it and see what I can eliminate.

Thanks for that.
Chris
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Old 10-17-2017, 08:17 PM   #4
Dbahnson
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I'm not sure I've ever seen one constructed like that, but the recessed area certainly looks more shallow than would accommodate most clocks.

The "crush plate" typically refers to the plate part of the metal hub.
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Old 10-19-2017, 03:53 PM   #5
cman
 
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I didn't even think someone could have put a clock in it, but its possible!

I spent some time going through and measuring points as noted on your chart and comparing them to the hub dimension chart. Nothing matches all the dimension but one matches two points and three of the others are close. The Wright A.

I know it's not 100% but still pretty cool since I don't have any numbers on it.

Thanks for your help.

Chris
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